For Professionals

Welcome to our page for professionals! We are currently using this page to link professionals with other websites and resources that contain current information about self-injury in youth. We have also provided some materials by INSYNC researchers, including powerpoint presentations and publications. In addition to the references regarding self-injury provided on our pages for youth, family and friends, the following websites and resources might be useful for professionals such as: teachers, school counselors, youth counselors and physicians.

Book

Nixon, M. K., & Heath, N. L. (June, 2008). Self-Injury in Youth: The Essential Guide to Assessment and Intervention. New York: Routledge Press.

This text represents the first evidenced based multi-author, multi-discipline publication that aims at providing the most up to date information regarding understanding and treating self injury in youth. In addition to having authors who represent the leading researchers in the field, this volume offers those working with these youth practical and step wise approaches to assessment and intervention.

In addition, Chapter 15 is a Resource Guide for Working with Youth, listing articles, manuals, web resources and books about self-injury for professionals, families and youth themselves. More information about this book can be found on the INSYNC Publications Page.

General Information for Professionals

As part of a collaboration between the University of Guelph and McGill University, the Self-Injury Outreach & Support website is a non-profit outreach initiative providing information and resources about self-injury to those who self-injure, those who have recovered, and those who want to help.

The site also provides resources specifically developed for medical professionals, mental health professionals, and school professionals.

The Canadian Mind Your Mind website has developed a ‘Pro Portal’ to bring professionals and youth together on one interactive website.

On this website you’ll find resources to help you engage youth in positive mental health.

Another UK-based website, belonging to the group ‘National Inquiry into Self-harm Among Young People’, has this information sheet for professionals working with youth who self-injure.

Link directly to the PDF by clicking on the image to the right.

The Cornell Research Program on Self-Injurious Behavior website summarizes this group’s research, and also provides resources and links to further information about self-injury in youth.

Click on the link to visit their ‘resources’ page.

School Professionals

SCHOOL COUNSELOR TRAINING WORKSHOP Non-Suicidal Self-Injury in the Schools

www.heath-onlineresearch.com

The Heath Research Team is pleased to offer a free online professional training workshop geared towards school-based mental health professionals working with adolescents who engage in non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI). The purpose of the workshop is to provide background information about NSSI, as well as practical tools for assessment and treatment of NSSI by mental heath professionals who work with adolescents within the school context.

The workshop is divided into three comprehensive modules. Each module includes the presentation of content information through a PowerPoint slideshow, downloadable resource documents, a complete reference list, and a brief quiz.

This material has been developed in collaboration with Dr. Nancy Heath in the Department of Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University and Dr. Victoria White Kress in the Department of Counseling and Special Education, Youngstown State University.

Currently, the training workshop is only available to the 450 school counselors who participated in a recent research project. However, the goal is to revise and improve the materials over the coming year and then open registration for the training workshop. If you are interested in being place on a waiting list, please forward your name and contact information to heathresearchteam@hotmail.com.

Adolescent Self-Injury: What High School Teachers Need to Know Nancy Heath, Ph.D., Erin Beettam, M.A., and Jack DeStefano, Ph.D.
Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University

Cautionary Note: There are images of self-injury in this Powerpoint Presentation.

Some Basic Features of a School Protocol to Manage Self-Injury

This document was developed by Barent W. Walsh, the author of Treating Self Injury. It is a guide to developing a staff protocol as well as training for staff to respond to adolescent students who self-injure.

This page, on the Royal College of Psychiatrists website (based in the United Kingdom) is for families and teachers dealing with youth who self-injure.

The section Where can I Get Help? in this fact sheet provides suggestions for parents and teachers. Further down the page, there is also a list of additional resources and web links.

This article, available on the National Association of School Psychologists website, discusses how school teachers and staff can improve their ability to respond to students who self-injure:

Lieberman, R. (2004). “Understanding and Responding to Students Who Self-Mutilate.” Principal Leadership (High School Ed.), 4, 10-13.

Self-Injury Outreach and Support: A Guide for School Professionals

Contents include:

  • Definition of non-suicidal self-injury
  • Why students self-injure
  • How do I know a student self-injures?
  • First Response
  • Referral Process
  • School Response Protocol
  • Other Considerations
  • Do students stop self-injuring?
  • References and Resources

Self-Injury in the Community: Implications for Treatment Nancy Heath, Ph.D., and Erin Beettam, M.A.
Educational and Counselling Psychology, McGill University

This Powerpoint Presentation is aimed at professionals working with youth who self-injure in the community.

Mental Health Clinicians

This presentation given in March 2009 reviews some of evidence from research by the INSYNC group about NSSI in youth and discusses future research projects.

Grand Rounds Presentation

Ottawa Self Injury Inventory (OSI)

This self report questionnaire has been used in youth in both outpatient and inpatient mental health settings to assess aspects of the behaviour. It is currently under evaluation in a multi-site inpatient study.

Revised June 2015

Ottawa Self Injury Inventory-Functions
(OSI-F)

This is a much abbreviated version of the OSI that focuses solely on identifying functions of self-injury such as affect regulation, interpersonal influence, self punishment, sensation seeking, etc. These questions are part of the longer version of the OSI and are currently being evaluated.

Revised June 2015

OSI Scoring Key

This scoring key is based on a factor analysis of the OSI in youth.

The Self Assessment Sheet (SAS) was developed to assess and follow over time self harm behaviour and associated issues.

The SAS:

  1. Identifies possible triggers
  2. Identifies cognitions associated with SI act
  3. Rates intensity of emotional state using a likeart scale
  4. Addresses any attempts to cope differently
  5. Provides a self assessment rating scale re coping
  6. Asks to youth to identify any consequences of their behaviour
  7. Can be used as both an assessment tool and a means to monitor any use of different coping skills with treatment over time.

Updated 2012

Ottawa Self Injury-German translation

Translation provided by Paul L. Plener, M.D., Dept. of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Ulm

February 2013 version

Family Physicians and Pediatricians

This presentation given in March 2009 reviews some of evidence from research by the INSYNC group about NSSI in youth and discusses future research projects.

Grand Rounds Presentation

Ottawa Self Injury Inventory (OSI)

This self report questionnaire has been used in youth in both outpatient and inpatient mental health settings to assess aspects of the behaviour. It is currently under evaluation in a multi-site inpatient study.

Revised June 2015

Ottawa Self Injury Inventory-Functions
(OSI-F)

This is a much abbreviated version of the OSI that focuses solely on identifying functions of self-injury such as affect regulation, interpersonal influence, self punishment, sensation seeking, etc. These questions are part of the longer version of the OSI and are currently being evaluated.

Revised June 2015

OSI Scoring Key

This scoring key is based on a factor analysis of the OSI in youth.

The Self Assessment Sheet (SAS) was developed to assess and follow over time self harm behaviour and associated issues.

The SAS:

  1. Identifies possible triggers
  2. Identifies cognitions associated with SI act
  3. Rates intensity of emotional state using a likeart scale
  4. Addresses any attempts to cope differently
  5. Provides a self assessment rating scale re coping
  6. Asks to youth to identify any consequences of their behaviour
  7. Can be used as both an assessment tool and a means to monitor any use of different coping skills with treatment over time.

Updated 2012

Ottawa Self Injury-German translation

Translation provided by Paul L. Plener, M.D., Dept. of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Ulm

February 2013 version

Psychiatrists

This presentation given in March 2009 reviews some of evidence from research by the INSYNC group about NSSI in youth and discusses future research projects.

Grand Rounds Presentation

Ottawa Self Injury Inventory (OSI)

This self report questionnaire has been used in youth in both outpatient and inpatient mental health settings to assess aspects of the behaviour. It is currently under evaluation in a multi-site inpatient study.

Revised June 2015

Ottawa Self Injury Inventory-Functions
(OSI-F)

This is a much abbreviated version of the OSI that focuses solely on identifying functions of self-injury such as affect regulation, interpersonal influence, self punishment, sensation seeking, etc. These questions are part of the longer version of the OSI and are currently being evaluated.

Revised June 2015

OSI Scoring Key

This scoring key is based on a factor analysis of the OSI in youth.

The Self Assessment Sheet (SAS) was developed to assess and follow over time self harm behaviour and associated issues.

The SAS:

  1. Identifies possible triggers
  2. Identifies cognitions associated with SI act
  3. Rates intensity of emotional state using a likeart scale
  4. Addresses any attempts to cope differently
  5. Provides a self assessment rating scale re coping
  6. Asks to youth to identify any consequences of their behaviour
  7. Can be used as both an assessment tool and a means to monitor any use of different coping skills with treatment over time.

Updated 2012

Ottawa Self Injury-German translation

Translation provided by Paul L. Plener, M.D., Dept. of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University of Ulm

February 2013 version

Links for participants of Singapore lectures/workshops, February 2013

Below are the poweroints made available for the next several months for Dr. Mary K. Nixon MD FRCPC lectures, seminars and workshops in Singapore, Feb 4-8, 2013.

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

Wednesday, February 6th, 2013

Thursday, February 7th, 2013

Friday, February 8th, 2013

This website is intended for educational and information purposes only. It is not intended to provide, nor should it be considered to be a substitute for, professional medical, counselling, or legal services. Users of the site are strongly advised to discuss the content of the site with a qualified professional. INSYNC does not accept any liability for any person who relies on the content of this site.